The Edith-Russ-Haus Award for Emerging Media Artists of the Sparda Bank 2014

Not logged in
Log in | Register | Forgot Password

The Edith-Russ-Haus Award for Emerging Media Artists of the Sparda Bank 2014

The Edith-Russ-Haus Award for Emerging Media Artists of the Sparda Bank 2014

Jury:

Andrea Cinel

Claudia Giannetti

Franz John

Piotr Krajewski

 

I) The jury has unanimously decided to present Edith-Russ-Haus Awards for Emerging Media Artists of the Sparda-Bank 2014, each of which includes prize money to the amount of €3,000 and participation in an exhibition, to the following artists:

Adam Basanta & Julian Stein, Invisible Lines, 2013

Sound installation

Axel Straschnoy, Kilpisjärvellä, 2012

4k full-dome film, 17’00” (planetarium)

 

II) Distinctions: Participation in the Exhibition

Anaisa Franco, Devenir: An Interface of Gender Fluctuation, 2013

Interactive audiovisual installation

Carolin Liebl & Nikolas Schmid-Pfähler, Vincent und Emily, 2012

Interactive robot installation

Lukas Marxt, “Reign of Silence”, 2013

Single-channel video, HD, 16:9, 7’20’’

 

III) The jury agreed to announce two special mentions for the following artists and works with the possibility of taking part in the exhibition.

Anaïs met den Ancxt & Grégory Lasserre, Fluides, 2011

Interactive installation

Borja Rodríguez Alonso, Why, 2013

Single-channel video, 4’53’’

 

Read on for detailed description on the jury's decision:

I) 

Adam Basanta & Julian Stein, Invisible Lines, 2013

Sound installation

The work Invisible Lines by the two Montreal-based sound artists and composers Adam Basanta and Julian Stein impressed the jury with the clarity of its uniting an apparent acoustic malfunction (microphone feedback) to become a multilayered sound and spatial composition. In this installation, six speakers and six microphones are situated opposite each other in a fixed order. Using software developed specifically for this purpose, the feedback loops and oscillating processes that are produced are held in a permanently changing yet self-regulating field of tension made up of chaotic structures (instability) and ordered structures (stability). This gives rise to a complex instrument from what is initially a simple arrangement that both plays with the expectations of viewers or listeners and at the same time baffles them in its nearly virtuoso intricacy as a composition.

 

Axel Straschnoy, Kilpisjärvellä, 2012

4k full-dome film, 17’00” (planetarium)

The work Kilpisjärvellä by the Argentinian artist Axel Straschnoy, who was born in Buenos Aires and now lives and works in Finland, won over the jury with the complexity, unconventional narrativity, and poetry with which it approaches and fathoms a natural phenomenon—the aurora borealis or northern lights—with artistic means.

The point of departure of what is initially a performative work are two actors who over the space of several days classically attempt to find the best possible location points for capturing this natural phenomenon. Using a HD camera—with a fish-eye lens and in stop motion—the plot itself becomes part of a subordinate concept lasting several days to extend what for the viewer is the visible part of the journey to the surrounding space, and to record it as a landscape with a daytime and a nighttime sky (with electroluminescent light phenomena) for playing it back later in an immersive exhibition situation as a planetarium.

 

II)

Anaisa Franco, Devenir: An Interface of Gender Fluctuation, 2013

Interactive audiovisual installation

The work is made up of two parts: an interactive object that consists of a mirror in which viewers can observe their own faces in the process of changing between having male and female features, and eleven video interviews in which transsexuals give an account of their own experiences.

The jury rated it as positive that the work deals with the complex questions of queer theory by bringing visitors face to face with their own identity construction and the open and honest accounts given by the interviewees. In this way, social, political, and cultural sets of issues are put up to debate within an individual context.

 

Carolin Liebl & Nikolas Schmid-Pfähler, Vincent und Emily, 2012

Interactive robot installation

Vincent und Emily are two headstrong robots that address the problems associated with communication in interpersonal and social relationships. Using sensors, they capture sounds and movements and react to these with their own expressions.

The jury was impressed by the way in which the relationships between human beings and technology are demonstrated. Two automatons are in bizarre conflict with their environment. Far from being mere objects of interactivity, Vincent and Emily express “emotions” and reactions in a subtle yet amusing way that tempts viewers to treat them as if they were living things.

 

Lukas Marxt, Reign of Silence, 2013

Single-channel video, HD, 16:9, 7’20’’

With reference to Spinoza, the Cologne-based Austrian artist Lukas Marxt (*1983) focuses on natura naturans. In other words, Marxt treats the idea that “nature does what is has to do” in an active sense. The jury was impressed by the metaphysical and minimalist aesthetics of the video Reign of Silence. A static shot features a calm lake before a mountain. A radio-controlled boat enters the scene, creates a spiral on the surface of the lake, and then leaves again, after which the spiral slowly disappears. It is not possible to identify any visual or acoustic human presence. Marxt evokes the likes of Robert Smithson, Richard Long, or James Benning, but he updates their contemplative language of land and performing art in a personal and poetic way.

 

III)

Anaïs met den Ancxt & Grégory Lasserre, Fluides, 2011

Interactive installation

Fluides is an organic and reactive installation in which water serves as an interface between the participant and the work. Depending on the intensity of electrostatic energy and various reciprocal actions from the public, different light and sound waves are produced on the surface. The jury acknowledges the exploration of unconventional interfaces for furthering the dialogue between the public and the work in an intuitive form.

 

Borja Rodríguez Alonso, Why, 2013

Single-channel video, 4’53’’

The work by the Spanish artist Borja Rodríguez Alonso (*1987) reflects on the impact media have on our daily lives and on our perception of mass society. His work casts light on the dynamics and paradoxes associated with the current mass participation in social networks. The jury was impressed by the critical questions posed by the single-channel video Why. Based on Google’s search help, the video shows how certain words or phrases that are entered are automatically completed. Although Google algorithms are not open to scrutiny, they are ascertained from data collected from countless Internet users and the results of interpolations. These suggestions reflect our interests, stereotypes, and fantasies, but they can also exercise an influence on our browsing behavior. Why confronts us with our current media conditioning and standardization through its simple but well-thought-out documentation of various search entries

The exhibition entry can be viewed here...

Edith-Russ-Haus for Media Art, Katharinenstraße 23, D-26121 Oldenburg, Tel.: +49(0)441/235-3208, Fax.: +49(0)441/235-2161
Opening Hours: Tuesday - Friday 14:00 -18:00, Saturday - Sunday 11:00 - 18:00, Monday closed info@edith-russ-haus.de
Imprint     Sitemap     
Ein Ausstellungshaus der
Stadt Oldenburg